Stay ahead of the curve and gain new insights as Derm RF presents the latest research on skin and skincare. What if at age 85, you could have few, if any, wrinkles? Sound impossible? Not if you live in Yuzurihara, Japan, a small, mountainous village two hours from Tokyo, where smooth-skinned 90-year-olds are commonplace. In fact, 10% of the population is aged 85 or older—10 times the norm for North America—and most have the plump skin of people decades younger.
The town doctor who studied the villagers for 60 years suggested that their youthfulness is tied to their steady diet of locally grown root vegetables and starchy “sticky” potatoes. These foods, it turns out, promote hyaluronic acid levels in the body.

Across all cultures, clear, radiant skin is viewed as a reflection of health and well-being. This perceived connection between appearance and health means that your skin is one of your best—or worst—marketing tools, sending a message to every person you meet.

Whether good or bad, your skin mirrors what is going on inside your body, and eating a well-balanced, healthy diet will help your skin look its best. A recipe for radiance begins with critically assessing your nutritional habits and making healthier adjustments, such as staying away from processed foods and, whenever possible, choosing fresh, organic products.

Keratosis Pilaris: A common skin condition, also known as “chicken skin” or “goose flesh,” characterized by rough, bumpy skin on the upper arms and tops of the thighs.

If you’re experiencing an unwanted skin souvenir in the form of tiny, rough, slightly red bumps on your arms, thighs or backside, you are not alone. This condition is called keratosis pilaris and is estimated to affect approximately 40% of adults and up to 80% of adolescents. Keratosis pilaris is a build-up of a protein called keratin at the opening of the hair follicle. This build-up produces spiky overgrowths of skin that can worsen as weather turns cooler and drier.

Along with increased stress and less face-to-face time with others, there’s one more potential wrinkle that comes from being connected 24/7.

Staring down at your smartphone, tablet and laptop too often could be giving you a neck that looks much older than you are—a condition some experts are calling “tech neck.” But before you swear off tech, know that there are some simple things you can do to help stave off lines, wrinkles, sagging skin and other telltale signs of “tech neck.”

For many of us, fall means one thing—football. While aggression on the football field can be a champion-maker, when it comes to your face, rough play is best left on the field. According to our two favorite complexion coaches, the most common mistake people make when it comes to overzealous skincare is treating exfoliation like a competitive sport. They think “the harder, the better,” but in reality, slow and steady wins over time.